INFLUENCERS AND LINGUISTIC TIPS: A POSSIBLE BINOMIAL

Social networks are literally revolutionizing our way of life. If, until some time ago, Instagram and TikTok were dedicated to lifestyle, now they are excellent social networks for learning some linguistic tips.

Linguistic tips: “You’re CEO of”

It often happens that you can see on TikTok a person say, in a comment, “You’re CEO of”. Technically, CEO stands for Chief Executive Officer. In other words, we are talking about the head of a company. When, on social media, you see the comment “You’re CEO of…”, it refers to a compliment. Basically, the recipient of the comment has been called very good, experienced, or even a “master” at something. If it’s a cooking video, for example, the comment then refers to their cooking skill. 

“Yikes”

It may also happen that some influencers, during their daily stories, use the word “yikes”. This is a situation of embarrassment or shock related to an event that happened to them.  When the embarrassment is high, then we talk about “big yikes”. 

 “To be honest” a new linguistic tips

For lovers of acronyms, TBH is something that is inescapable. It’s really popular and allows you to condense the words “to be honest”. It is used by both influencers and users talking to their friends via stories. It is used whenever you want to speak open-heartedly and sincerely about something or someone. To be honest is in fact a lexical form to introduce a certain opinion. 

BAE

How can we not mention the widely used BAE? It’s nothing more than an acronym that stands for “Before Anyone Else”. It is used to refer to a person who comes “before anyone else”, literally translated. In general, it is used to refer to your best friend, but also to a brother or sister, a parent, or a person who you are emotionally attached to.

OK BOOMER!

To conclude “OK, boomer” is one of the most inflated expressions in recent times and represents the response that the younger generation gives when they are scolded by older people, i.e. boomers. The boomers in the common language are also people who are simply a bit old-fashioned who do not understand current fashions or catchphrases.

A very funny tidbit about this term dates back to 2019, when Chlöe Swarbrick (a member of New Zealand’s parliament) referred to an older legislator with the term “OK, Boomer” after interrupting his speech on climate change. To the captioning staff at New Zealand Parliamentary TV, Chlöe Swarbrick’s remark turned out to be unintelligible!!! 

So, there are some examples that are often used by influencers, the meaning of which can escape people immediately. Social slang and everyday life are something that will become more and more intertwined on the coming years! 

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EPLS

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written by eleonora the 14 June, 2021


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